The Great Gatsby movie cover Movie Locations Guide

Where was The Great Gatsby filmed?

1974

About The Great Gatsby

Spoilers ahead! The Great Gatsby was released in 1974 and is an American romantic drama focused on the life and love of Jay Gatsby (portrayed by Robert Redford). It is an adaptation of the novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald of the same name. It was scripted by skilled penman Francis Ford Coppola (of The Godfather fame), directed by Jack Clayton, and distributed by Paramount Pictures.

The storyline starts with Nick Carraway (Sam Waterston) narrating his learnings and experiences with the filthy rich of old America. He is the cousin of Daisy Buchanan (Mia Farrow), a wealthy socialite from Louisville, Kentucky, with connections in Chicago. Daisy is the trophy wife of Tom Buchanan, who inherited an obscene amount of money, and now dabbles in polo horses. They live in a posh, residential area in East Egg in New York, where class and background are considered the only measures for social success. Daisy's closest friend, Jordan Baker (Lois Chiles), also lives with them and is primarily a companion to Daisy when her husband is away.

Tom is shown to be having an affair with the wife of a car mechanic, Myrtle Wilson (Karen Black), and Daisy and Tom have a miserable married life. Nick moves into a new rented house, where he soon meets his affluent neighbor, Jay Gatsby. Jay pushes Nick to organize a tea with his cousin, Daisy. Unbeknownst to Nick, Daisy and Jay have been lovers from before she married. Jay has never gotten over Daisy, and soon their relationship is rekindled since Jay is now more affluent and successful than Tom. Because Daisy refused Jay when he was poor and married Tom for his wealth and status, Jay tries to get Daisy to leave her husband and stay with him instead.

However, a tragedy follows with two lives lost and unrequited love.

City Locations

Narragansett Bay, Newport, Rhode Island, New Jersey, New York City, New York, Uxbridge, Massachusetts, Iver Heath, UK

Location Types

Architectural, American, Oceanview, House, Mansions, Retro, Victorian, Banquet Halls, Clubs/ Bars

Location Styles

Americana, Bohemian, Boat Style, Classic Car, Colonial, Dated, Retro, Victorian, Luxury, Mid-century Modern, Old Hollywood, Sail

The Great Gatsby Locations

The Great Gatsby production team chose some fabulous filming locations for the movie. Most of the film shooting locations were in the United States in New York and Newport. However, many filming locations are in old Victorian homes and stately manors in England. These houses were chosen for their interiors, the elaborate decor, opulent furnishings, and period furniture already present.

All these locations were chosen for the anchoring to the scenes in the book, with elaborate descriptions, richness in lifestyle, and extravagance. The places are Uxbridge, Massachusetts, Narragansett Bay, Newport, Rhode Island, New Jersey, New York City, and New York State in the United States, and Iver Heath in the UK.

The locations featured in the movie fit perfectly with those in the books, although certain shots had to be taken mid-water, like the opening scene in the film.

Teaser: The East and West Egg locations mentioned in The Great Gatsby are Great Neck's and Port Washington's real-life areas. These functional places were mentioned to give viewers a sense of direction and relatability. Fans of the film can visit these places and click fabulous photographs, selfies, and enjoy the hospitality of the local people. There are also plenty of extravagant resorts, hotels, and eateries to make the trip enjoyable.

Fun fact:

This movie was not the first of its kind, and another was made in 1949 with the same title – The Great Gatsby. However, the earlier version did not receive the fame and success that the 1974 one did. The movie was made with a $7 million budget but grossed over $26 million.

Nick goes across the bay to meet his cousin scene in The Great Gatsby

Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island

Nick Carraway (portrayed by Sam Waterston) crosses the bay and goes 20 miles east of New York in his boat to visit his cousin, Daisy Buchanan (Mia Farrow), and her husband, Tom Buchanan (Bruce Dern). Nick lives in West Egg, the less fashionable side of Chicago. Nick meets Bruce at the Polo Club.

Throughout the film, Nick Carraway is more of a narrator, and in this opening scene, he is heard telling himself, "In my younger and more vulnerable years, my father gave me some advice that I've been turning over in my mind ever since." He explains that his father said, "Whenever you feel like criticizing anyone, just remember that all the people in this world haven't had the advantages that you've had." As he continues his internal musings, Nick meets Tom at Newport and gets into Tom's car to meet Daisy.

The Great Gatsby filming location is Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Narragansett Bay is the bay to the north of Rhode Island and Newport and is a major travel route between the mainland and the surrounding islands. You can cross the bay from any of the locations at Narragansett or other piers and take the ferry across to Newport while enjoying the gorgeous views.

Nick and Daisy meet each other scene in The Great Gatsby

Heatherden Hall, Iver Heath, UK

Nick enters Buchanan Estate with his brother-in-law, Tom Buchanan, and sees his cousin, Daisy Buchanan (Mia Farrow), resting on a couch sofa with her friend Jordan Baker (Lois Chiles) on another. As he enters, Daisy exclaims, "Nick! Is it really you?" Nick responds, "It is." She introduces Nick, "Jordan, this is my second cousin, once removed, Nick Carraway."

Daisy is quite chirpy and demands, "Tom says you've just come from Chicago. Tell me everything. Do they miss me?" Nick smiles and replies, "The whole town is desolate. All the cars have their left rear wheel painted black in mourning, and there's a persistent wail all night." Hearing this, Daisy starts chuckling and says to Tom, "Let's go back tomorrow, Tom. I love a persistent wail."

This filming location of The Great Gatsby is the historic Heatherden Hall at Iver Heath in the United Kingdom. While many of the filming locations are in the US, the Great Gatsby locations are split between UK and US, with several Victorian homes as the residences of the characters in the movie. Fans can visit Heatherden Hall by hopping onto the blue bus number 3 and getting off at Swallow Street. From this stop, you can walk to Heatherden Hall.

Tom Buchanan buys his mistress a puppy scene in The Great Gatsby

1st Avenue at East 59th Street, New Jersey, New York, US

Tom Buchanan takes Nick to meet his mistress, Myrtle Wilson (Karen Black). Myrtle is married to Tom's car mechanic George Wilson (Scott Wilson). While they're all at George's mechanic shop, Tom tells Myrtle to leave and get into the car. Myrtle climbs over Nick to kiss Tom and settles back in the seat.

While settling in and the car moves forward, she suddenly sees a vendor selling puppies on a street corner. Myrtle tells Tom, "Stop! Stop here! I wanna get one of these dogs. I want one for the apartment. They're so nice to have." She asks the vendor, "What kind are they?" The vendor replies, "All kinds. What kind would you like, lady?" Even though she wants a police dog, Myrtle finally gets a puppy, and Tom pays the vendor $10 for the female puppy.

While there are no funny scenes in The Great Gatsby, this one brought a smile to the audience's faces. Most animal lovers felt it was a sweet gesture, and getting an animal off the streets and into a comfortable forever home is always a noble thing. The street where the shot was filmed is 1st Avenue at E 59th St., New Jersey, New York. You can hop onto bus number 181, get off at Palisade Avenue at Riverdale Drive, and walk for one minute to reach the spot.

Jay Gatsby hosts an extravagant party scene in The Great Gatsby

Rosecliff, 548 Bellevue Avenue, Newport

Nick gets an invitation to one of Jay Gatsby's (Robert Redford) extravagant parties. The party is as indulgent as one can imagine. People are dancing around water fountains, with tall, white, well-lit columns and constant jazz music playing everywhere. All guests have free-flowing wine and alcohol, food, drinks, and titbits. As he is mingling, he sees Jordan at the party. He approaches Jordan, who is also pleased to see him there. She says, "I know your cousin Daisy has an absolute craving for you, but I'm gonna borrow you for tonight."

As Nick and Jordan are seated at a table, they start hearing stories about Jay Gatsby ranging from spy to philanthropist and everything in between. While they are listening to all the rumors, Jordan says, "Gatsby never really goes to his own parties. Just looks in to see who's here, then disappears." Nick is called in to meet Jay Gatsby, who greets Nick, saying, "How do you do, old sport? I'm Gatsby." Nick smiles and walks forward, greeting him in return, "Nick Carraway. It's a pleasure."

Fans can visit the Great Gatsby location at Rosecliff, 548 Bellevue Ave in Newport, and take a walk through the grand hallways and water fountains. Simply hop onto bus number 67 from the Newport Visitor Center, get off at Bellevue opposite Rosecliff, and walk for a minute to reach the stately manor house.

Gatsby dons his old army uniform to dance with Daisy Buchanan scene in The Great Gatsby

Marble House, 596 Bellevue Avenue, Newport

Daisy is over at Jay Gatsby's house, and they are moving forward with their love affair. Since they are old flames, it becomes effortless for Jay and Daisy to rekindle their love, especially since Jay never moved on from Daisy, and Daisy is not in love with her husband, Tom. While Jay is romancing Daisy, she tells him, "Put on your uniform." When Jay says he thinks it's foolish, Daisy tells him it's about time they were a little foolish.

Daisy says beguilingly, "Put on your uniform, and we'll turn out all the lights except for a single candle. And I'll let you tell me you love me." Respecting her wishes, Jay Gatsby dons his old lieutenant's uniform, and they both dance together in the light of a single lit candle.

Many fans argue this is one of the best scenes in The Great Gatsby since Daisy and Jay have always been in love, and to most, it is evident that they should be together. This incredible romantic scene is shot at the famous Marble House at 596 Bellevue Avenue, Newport. Marble House is walking distance from Rosecliff, and fans can visit both places by catching the number 67 bus from the Newport Visitor Center.

The two cars on the bridge scene in The Great Gatsby

Queensboro Bridge, East 59th Street, New York

Jay, Tom, Daisy, Jordan, and Nick are at the Buchanan's Estate. They are meeting over tea and are planning to spend the day together. It's sweltering in the house, so they all plan to go into town so they can feel cooler and entertain themselves. Tom, Nick, and Jordan get into Jay's car, while Daisy and Jay get into Tom's car.

While they are on the way, they cross a large bridge, and Jordan says to Nick, "I love New York on summer afternoons when everyone's away. There's something very sensuous about it, a little ripe as if all sorts of funny fruits are going to fall into your hands." Suddenly they hear honking from behind, and Daisy puts her head out of the car, asking Tom, "Where are we going?" Jordan asks, "How about the movies?" Daisy says, "It's too hot! You go. We'll drive around and meet you after. We'll meet you on some corner. I'll be the man smoking two cigarettes!" Tom gets in the way and says, "Well obviously, we can't argue here, so you follow me to the Plaza Hotel."

The iconic bridge used for The Great Gatsby film scene with the five main characters is Queensboro Bridge in New York. To get to this bridge in New York, take the green line southbound train and get off at Lexington Avenue. From here, the bridge is a few minutes' walk.

Conclusion

The Great Gatsby is regarded as one of the greatest movies of Robert Redford, and the film is still known as an evergreen classic. The movie had compelling messages about the class divide in turn-of-the-century America, with everything from the opulent and rich lifestyles of the monied people, to the stigmatization of poor people in struggling conditions. This divide is made more poignant in the film's final scenes with the father of Jay Gatsby explaining his son's meager upbringing and ambitions.

The driving force behind Jay Gatsby's success was the spurned affections of his ambitious lover, who chose to marry for riches and not love. The Great Gatsby was deemed great for his passion, drive to succeed, and subsequent affluence shown through his lifestyle, money, parties, and opulence.

The production team did a fabulous job choosing filming locations that were perfect for the storyline, with a fantastic cast for the main characters.